How to Fake a Student-Centered Classroom

How to Fake a Student-Centered Classroom

It’s the time of year where preparing for the NCTE (National Council of Teachers of English) conference moves into full swing. My co-presenters & I are building on last year’s session on becoming a reflexive practitioner. This year we’re talking about moving from reflexivity into action. For our purposes, reflexivity means looking not only at what happened, but the beliefs, attitudes, and values undergirding what you do, think, say. I […]

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Banish the Expert

Banish the Expert

I finished my doctorate. (Finally.) I’ve taken about two months to decompress– made a big new perennial garden, broken in a new bicycle– and now I’m easing in to the realm of What’s Next? The plan this summer is to banish the Expert from my life on the interwebz. That Expert being me, of course. Spend enough time working, researching, reading, teaching in academe and […]

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Straddling Multiple Worlds in a MOOC

Straddling Multiple Worlds in a MOOC

I’ve done it. I’ve signed up for Connected Courses, mapped my blog to my own domain (and paid the $), downloaded WordPress, and added my blog to the syndicated list. I must be out of my mind. Why, you ask? Here’s the list. I’m writing my dissertation and planning to Be Done this year. The title, Breaking Open the Wor(l)d: New Literacies, the World Wide Web, […]

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Reforming the Start of the School Year

It’s the start of a new school year! Teacher energy is high. Administrators are keenly focused on supporting their teachers to get off on a great start. Unless you’re the English teacher in this situation. I’ll call her Randi. Randi is a Nationally Board Certified Teacher with fifteen-plus teaching years under her belt. She moved to a new school four years ago and, once again, […]

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Othello Uptown

In the final session during the recent English Companion Ning Webstitute on reading classic and YA lit with students, Jennie asked me to revisit the wonderful work of one of my student teachers. The place: A middle school in one of the northern-most neighborhoods of Manhattan, largely Latino, failing. (Funny how many so-called “failing” schools in NYC are in poor and or largely minority neighborhoods.) […]

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4 Lessons from the 3rd Webstitute

Webstitute #3 at the English Companion Ning closed earlier in the evening; I thought I’d catch a few thoughts in writing before they drifted away forever. Here are four that come to mind first: Lesson #1 Check the tech!  Need I say more? Well, one addition to my post from the other day. I think the best learning in tech situations comes from posing a […]

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PD as High-Wire Routine, Part 2 (Y’All Come Now, You Hear?)

So. We have the bare bones technical details ironed out. We think. 😉 Here’s our FAQ. EC NING WEBSTITUTE III Reading Classic and YA Texts with Students FAQ! Links to Session Descriptions & Discussion Forums MONDAY July 11 4-5 pm EDT  Teresa Bunner Balancing the Literary Scales Taking place on Adobe Connect 5-6 pm EDT  Young Adult Lit SuperPanel Taking place on Adobe Connect 6-7 […]

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The Knife-Edge of Praxis

You can tell we’re entering crunch time in the semester; more of us are closing the library at night and I’ve taken to packing a power strip when I head in for the day– it’s hard to believe there are not enough outlets for a table of six earnest (panicking?) grad students. My current mission is a short paper due tonight, for my class in […]

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It’s the WRITING, Stupid.

When Bill Clinton ran for office, his advisors hammered home the importance of staying on point. For the campaign workers, for the brilliant candidate who could get tangled in the nuances of complex ideas, for the voters at that time in the nation’s life, there was one point, and one point only: It’s the economy, stupid. Here we are, many years later. Now it is […]

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