Technology In the Sanctuary: The Story of a Revolution

What happens to the social and cultural foundations of a traditional institution and its members when they are pushed to embrace new technologies of the internet? Or, phrased differently, when these new technologies force their way into the most sacred spaces? If I were talking to educators working to foster new mindsets, practices, and perspectives of teaching and learning, the answer most often would be, […]

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Where Does News Live?

Her nails are always perfect. She uses clear polish so you don’t always notice them. Until she starts tapping the cell phone sitting on the table between you. Then you notice the perfect shape, the perfect cuticles. Today her perfect index finger jabs at the phone. “I think I am the only person who still reads a real newspaper,” she says. “Now it’s all in […]

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How The Interwebz Helped Bring Donald Trump To Power

Go with me here. This is no typical political analysis. Rather, it’s a journey through some of the deep– and invisible– changes in society triggered, in part, by the development of communications technologies. Specifically, the internet. And, while it appears to be about Donald Trump, I believe it goes a long way toward explaining educator resistance to bringing technologies– and the related dispositions– into the […]

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Kool-Aid & the Worlds Online

Terry Elliott’s post of 9/18, Outsiders in Academe: Iconoclasty 101, got me thinking, so much so that when I left a comment on his post, I realized it was probably more appropriate as a post for my blog. I’ve added a few things for clarity, but what appears below is for the most part what I wrote to him. ————————- Terry wrote “In his latest book, […]

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Rant Alert: Problems with Internet Access Are Mental Too

I was in a meeting today about a youth program I’m helping develop. I needed to take some notes, so I pulled out my phone, brought up my favorite note-taking app, and starting typing away. Somebody leaned over and smirked, “That’s right, practice being a role model for the kids.” I went from calm to infuriated in about two seconds. I had to leave the meeting […]

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Thackery in a Bunker?

NCTE 2011 may have ended on Sunday, November 20, but it’s been tumbling in my head since then. Rather than offer a blow-by-blow description of events, I want to pull together some thoughts that continue some from the post that came before this, “Missing Thackery.” I was lucky to have been invited to present on a panel with Jen Roberts and Sarah Fidelibus and coordinated by […]

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Musing about MOOCs

The two MOOCs I’ve played with in the last two weeks couldn’t be more different. #Change 11‘s 1,000+ participants puts the Massive in MOOC, making Alec Couros’ EC&I 831, with 31 credit students and 131 non-credit students, feel positively cozy. #Change 11 is loosely structured; participants are directed to create a Web presence, tag all their Web documents, and find kindred spirits. E&C 831 is […]

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Of Insights & Supernovas

Some days, I think I am a very slow learner. Today is one such day. Today is also a day when a whole lot of things I’ve been thinking about have collided in a supernova of insight. In a recent blog post, I mentioned the idea (of a scholar/writer whose name eludes me) that teachers need to become public intellectuals. I’ve been thinking about what […]

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Homework Becomes Electric

As part of my class in curriculum theorizing, I have to devise a homework plan, something that will move me along in my own work as I engage the ideas and readings from class. I’m going to do it on my blog, under the category of Homework. We are in the middle of a revolution in public schooling, and I see it as a revolution […]

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